info

Detained Women

Nativism - Introduction

Nativism - Introduction

In the mid-1840s, anti-immigrant activity, mainly against Irish Catholics, developed in urban areas along the East Coast. From 1880 to 1921, immigrants experienced an increasing nativism - the desire to protect the interests of native-born or established inhabitants over those of immigrants - from both the native-born Anglo-Saxons and the earlier immigrant populations from Northern and Western Europe. The number and diversity of the immigrants frightened Americans. The largely Protestant Americans were wary of the newcomers who were predominantly Catholic (from Ireland, Italy, Poland, and Greece) and Jewish (from Germany, Russia, Poland and Hungary). Americans also felt that the immigrants, who were unaccustomed to democracy and suspicious of this new form of government, were a threat to the American government. And the physical appearance of the malnourished immigrants in their native dress was peculiar if not frightening to the Americans.

Nativists actively sought to eliminate the perceived threat of immigrants who they blamed for the social and economic ills of urban areas. Some nativists wrote anti-immigrant books, others engaged in violent actions against immigrants who were strike-breakers, still others lobbied Congress and state legislatures to pass anti-immigrant legislation.

←
Introduction
 
Nativist Organisations
 
Socialism and Anarchy
 
Excluding Prostitutes, Convicts, Illiterates, Anarchists, and the Feeble-Minded
 
Federal Legislation
 
→

Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>

Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>