The Homeland of Migrating Groups - Eastern Europe

info

Climbing into America, Ellis Island, 1905

Climbing into America, Ellis Island, 1905 Poƫzieplaatje (Poetry Image) Emigrants [sur Ellis Island], une famille de hongrois. (Emigrants [at Ellis Island], an Hungarian family) Bicycle club, Wilno, Minnesota

The Homeland of Migrating Groups - Eastern Europe

Eastern European migration was the result of a cocktail of economic malaise, political turmoil, and ethnic and religious persecution. The majority of these immigrants were Eastern European Jews. These Jews, living in the Russian Empire - which at that time covered large parts of Eastern Europe like present-day Ukraine, Belarus, the Baltic States and parts of Poland - had been subject to harsh treatment, discrimination and persecution. From the 1880s onward, these persecutions culminated in violent pogroms in which Jewish ghettoes and villages were destroyed, and thousands of Jews were murdered. This led to mass migration, with the U.S. as prime destination. Between 1880 and the early 1920s, between 2 and 3 million Jews arrived in the United States. 
As borders regularly moved with the outcomes of wars and conflicts, estimations of migration numbers from Eastern Europe differ widely. Populations could be divided over several states, which was the case with the hundreds of thousands of Polish emigrants who moved to the United States. It’s estimated that around 4 million emigrants from one of the other great Eastern European Empires - Austro-Hungary - left their homelands to seek better and brighter futures overseas.

←
Introduction
 
Ireland and the UK
 
Western Europe
 
Eastern Europe
 
Southern Europe
 
Scandinavia
 
→

Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>

Comments

Allowed tags: <p>, <a>, <em>, <strong>, <ul>, <ol>, <li>